Buzzing

Reimagined Book Covers

  Early Morning  (18" x 24")  Contemplation  by Onelio Marrero, oil painting

Early Morning (18" x 24") Contemplation by Onelio Marrero, oil painting

While we would never advise you to judge a book by its cover, as art people we know the power of a strong image. So, in keeping with our Literary Week theme, here are the UGallery artworks that we think would make A+ covers for famous books.

The Count of Monte Christo by Alexandre Dumas:

  Sir Edward XVII  (41" x 32") by Carlos Gamez de Francisco, watercolor painting

Sir Edward XVII (41" x 32") by Carlos Gamez de Francisco, watercolor painting

"'Oh, father,' said Albert, smiling, 'you clearly do not know the Count of Monte Cristo. He finds satisfaction elsewhere than in the things of this world and does not aspire to any honours, taking only those that can fit on his passport.'" 

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe:

"Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the Nightly shore —
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!"
Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore.'"

Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Harding:

She was a fine and handsome girl—not handsomer than some others, possibly—but her mobile peony mouth and large innocent eyes added eloquence to colour and shape. She wore a red ribbon in her hair, and was the only one of the white company who could boast of such a pronounced adornment.

The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupéry: 

 The Fox (30" x 22") by Heejin Sutton, mixed media artwork

The Fox (30" x 22") by Heejin Sutton, mixed media artwork

People have forgotten this truth,” the fox said. “But you mustn’t forget it. You become responsible forever for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose.

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee:

  Spread Your Wings  (24" x 30") by Mel Kistner, acrylic painting

Spread Your Wings (24" x 30") by Mel Kistner, acrylic painting

I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do.

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf:

To watch a leaf quivering in the rush of air was an exquisite joy. Up in the sky swallows swooping, swerving, flinging themselves in and out, round and round, yet always with perfect control as if elastics held them; and the flies rising and falling; and the sun spotting now this leaf, now that, in mockery, dazzling it with soft gold in pure good temper; and now again some chime (it might be a motor horn) tinkling divinely on the grass stalks—all of this, calm and reasonable as it was, made out of ordinary things as it was, was the truth now; beauty, that was the truth now. Beauty was everywhere.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott:

  Girl in the Wooden Chair  (36" x 24") by Carolyn Schlam, oil painting

Girl in the Wooden Chair (36" x 24") by Carolyn Schlam, oil painting

I’ve got the key to my castle in the air, but whether I can unlock the door remains to be seen.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald: 

  Hello Gorgeous  (20" x 16") by Sumner Crenshaw, oil painting

Hello Gorgeous (20" x 16") by Sumner Crenshaw, oil painting

Then he kissed her. At his lips’ touch she blossomed for him like a flower and the incarnation was complete.

The Odyssey by Homer:

  Periwinkle Glow  (24" x 24") by Sally Adams and Drew Marin Lopez, acrylic painting

Periwinkle Glow (24" x 24") by Sally Adams and Drew Marin Lopez, acrylic painting

When young Dawn with her rose-red fingers shone once more
I set out down the coast of the wide-ranging sea,
praying hard to the gods for all their help,
taking with me the three men I trusted most
on every kind of mission.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë:

  The Calm  (11"x 14") by Jill Poyerd, oil painting

The Calm (11"x 14") by Jill Poyerd, oil painting

I wish I were out of doors! I wish I were a girl again, half savage and hardy, and free; and laughing at injuries, not maddening under them! Why am I so changed? why does my blood rush into a hell of tumult at a few words? I’m sure I should be myself were I once among the heather on those hills.

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White:

  Happy Pig  (24" x 36") by Carolyn Pennor, acrylic painting

Happy Pig (24" x 36") by Carolyn Pennor, acrylic painting

Fern was up at daylight, trying to rid the world of injustice. As a result, she now has a pig. A small one to be sure, but nevertheless a pig. It just shows what can happen if a person gets out of bed promptly.

A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket:

  The Island  (10.25" x 7") by Chamisa Kellogg, watercolor painting

The Island (10.25" x 7") by Chamisa Kellogg, watercolor painting

At times the world may seem an unfriendly and sinister place, but believe that there is much more good in it than bad. All you have to do is look hard enough.