Curating

New Artist Round Up

  One of UGallery's newest artists, Laura Browning painting.

One of UGallery's newest artists, Laura Browning painting.

In this monthly installment, we welcome this month's newest artists to UGallery. These artists work in a range of styles and mediums and join us from around the globe. We are excited to introduced the following artists:

INTRODUCING: LAURA BROWNING

Based on her portfolio, it comes as no surprise that Laura Browning is inspired by the water. “I am most inspired by being submerged in water, watching the movement of the light refraction,” she says. “I want to capture the feeling of water.” Each painting utilizes a slightly different palette of blue, turquoise, and gray to convey different aquatic settings. The viewer sees that although there is little change in the behavior of water, the color of bays, pools, and oceans have intriguing variability. Laura creates her underwater scenes with many layers of transparent oil glazes and rhythmic blending of color.

INTRODUCING: STEPHEN CAPOGNA

In a striking example of hyperrealism, Stephen Capogna’s body of work manages to capture the essence of macro photography in highly detailed acrylic paintings. Stephen’s inspiration initially came from golf courses near his home. The work focuses on the minute details of sporting goods, from the lightly scratched dimples on a golf ball to the individual fibers on a tennis ball. He works exclusively from his own photographs using an innovative airbrushing technique. Stephen utilizes a large spray gun at the beginning of a painting for color application in large areas. He then wields a small airbrush for the finer details, using templates hand-cut from mylar to create edges and shapes. “One of the biggest defining moments for me was incorporating the airbrush into my process of painting,” Stephen says. “Because I am limited somewhat with studio time, the airbrush allowed me to move much quicker.

INTRODUCING: RAY DEBAUN

The abstract creations of Ray DeBaun exist at the intersection of fine art, draftsmanship, and carpentry. He starts each image by creating a digital doodle on his smartphone, and then brings it to life with analog methods. The artist enjoys using traditional tools including compasses, T-squares, and triangles to craft geometric abstractions with impressive consideration of depth and form. Each panel, built from wood, takes the shape of the geometric composition, so no two paintings are alike. The work is at once dimensional and flat, creating a delightful contradiction for the eye. Based in central Oregon, Ray is inspired by the likes of Frank Stella and Frank Lloyd Wright.

INTRODUCING: BESTY PODLACH 

As a student, Betsy received a scholarship to study visual art at Harvard, a feat she describes as key to her progression as an artist. Betsy’s portraits exude emotion through the expressive eyes of her figures. Looking down, just past the viewer, or at a partner, each gaze offers an understanding of the subject’s psychological state. Primarily painting from life, Betsy focuses on the intersection of the physical, emotional, and intellectual characteristics both of her subjects and within herself. “I love stories and novels, poetry and plays–I hope my work comes alive, tells a story, and does so in a way that stops time, in a permanent image.”

INTRODUCING: JANINE ETHERINGTON 

  City Glow Nightscape  (14" x 14") by Janine Etherington, acrylic painting

City Glow Nightscape (14" x 14") by Janine Etherington, acrylic painting

Janine’s abstract artworks are created with measured doses of both intuition and analysis. “My work develops as a series of calls and responses,” she says. She adds color, letting gravity pull the paint around. She then responds to the direction of the composition with additional marks, adding and subtracting. The incorporation of recognizable forms, specifically letters and numbers, indicates the influences of Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg on Janine’s work. Janine is also inspired by listening to jazz music. She is a musician herself, and plays in a local Zimbabwean marimba ensemble when she’s not painting.

INTRODUCING: SARAH TEASDALE 

Sarah’s abstract work draws on shapes in geometry and technology to create vibrant compositions. “Patterns have an underlying mathematical structure and can be seen as a search for regularities,” says Sarah. “When we recognize these arrangements we have a powerful emotional reaction that is rooted in our instincts and development.” Her work is based in patterns, repeating shapes that create larger fields of color and form. The abstract paintings can be consumed either passively or actively, depending on the viewer’s intentions. While one pair of eyes might find an aesthetic pattern, other might find 3D puzzles and mazes. Ultimately, it is viewer’s choice.

INTRODUCING: MELANIE POSNER 

Melanie Posner’s body of work is about self-love and embracing the female body. She is inspired by independent, joyful women who respect their bodies in spite of societal norms that dictate standards for beauty. “Painting ladies who love themselves and their bodies helped me, in return, to love my flaws,” says Melanie. “I paint in vibrant colors because it fills me with happiness.” The artist uses collage and oils to bring life to female figures of varying physiques. The work not only critiques the pressure on women to be thin and beautiful, but also empowers and celebrates body positivity.

INTRODUCING: PAM HASSLER 

Pam calls her abstract paintings “inner landscapes of mind and spirit.” Her abstract colors dance across each picture plane in balanced compositions that are meditatively pleasing to the eye. Warm and cool, bright and muted; Pam’s color juxtapositions create movement in her work. The compositions are developed in her mind, often when listening to music or in dreams. Pam paints from her 1860 home with high ceilings and large windows with lots of northern light.

INTRODUCING: HOLLY SCOGGINS

Artist and professor Holly Scoggins presents a surrealist body of work that layers imagery and meaning through what could be described as a double exposure in oil paint. Holly begins her process by finding both vintage and contemporary images, then digitally manipulates them by creating overlap between the photographs. Finally, she paints the two fused images simultaneously as one composition. The work is wrought with eerie symbolism. By linking a historical image with a current one, Holly addresses often controversial and complex issues of humanity and culture.

INTRODUCING: CARL GRAUER

Carl grew up in rural Kansas with little exposure to fine art, but a wonderful school art teacher pushed him to pursue a creative path. His still life work is influenced by Wayne Thiebaud’s stylized realism, candy colors, and visible brushstrokes. Inspired by objects and scenes from his daily life, Carl includes items of both traditional and contemporary origin in his still life compositions. Carl also demonstrates his comprehensive understanding of the human form in his figurative and portrait work. He offers commissioned portraits from life in the New York metropolitan area, usually formatted as a two-hour experience with the sitter. Interested clients can inquire about portrait commissions by clicking to request custom art on Carl’s portfolio page.

INTRODUCING: HARPER HENRY

Harper is inspired by her love for horses. She is based in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona, just ten minutes from the Tonto National Forest where over 500 wild horses run free. Her impressionist yet contemporary interpretations of the majestic creatures, often against vibrant backgrounds, are deeply in touch with the spirit of the animals. The horses are painted with a clear understanding of classical realism as well. “As I explore the line between realism and abstraction, it is very common that I deliberately devastate a days worth of meticulous realistic painting with rogue brush strokes so that it will cause me to rebuild and reconstruct with abstraction,” she says. “I find sometimes, this is the only way to break myself away from the realism and look at the piece with fresh eyes.”

INTRODUCING: KERSTIN PAILLARD

  Springtime 2  (11.8" x 11.8")   by Kerstin Paillard, pastel artwork

Springtime 2 (11.8" x 11.8") by Kerstin Paillard, pastel artwork

French artist Kerstin Paillard creates abstract compositions on canvas using dry pastels, comparable to highly pigmented chalks, a medium typically used on paper. “I put coat after coat of colored chalk on the canvas, moistening them and piling up one surface on another until these works take on something of the quality of miniature frescoes,” she says. Kerstin’s work is informed by an array of artists including Degas, who used pastels in a similar painterly manner. The pastel artworks in Kerstin’s body of work are akin to soft, ethereal color field paintings with a rich depth of blended color that is typically associated with oil paint. The artist works from a bright and sunny seaside studio in the South of France.

SHOP ARTWORK BY ALL NEW ARTISTS ON UGALLERY.