Creating

Breaking The Mold: Meet 3 Sculptors of UGallery

UGallery sculptor Ivan Markovic working with stone

UGallery sculptor Ivan Markovic working with stone

The sculptors of UGallery bring a new dimension to our gallery. By breaking into the physical world the sculptures they create form a different kind relationship with the viewer unique to the medium.

Whether the deep questions asked by a smooth minimalist sculpture, the heartwarming sympathies emulated by figurative work, or the marvelous curiosity of an ocean-inspired ceramic, discover the enriched dimension and emotions that our sculptors lead.

1. Ivan Markovic, from Belgrade, Serbia and Montanegro

Ivan Markovic working on a sculpture

Ivan Markovic working on a sculpture

Ivan Markovic’s smooth minimalist sculptures channel all the meditative powers of deep thought. Minimal in their style though complex in their concepts, his portfolio of sculptures center around big questions such as those of the human condition and the nature of love. The sculptures’ preparation time is savored, if not, protracted; where, at each phase of creation in the most literal sense, adding dimensions. Long before they enter the concrete, three-dimensional world, his sculptures begin in the abstract – as ideas. The ideas migrate into the second dimension, as he works on paper. And finally, they rise into the third dimension of wood and stone, when he begins his sculpting. For Ivan, sculpting is a family tradition; he learned to sculpt from his father when he was quite young and by his teenage years had graduated to sculptor’s apprentice.

Links (9.8” x 11.8”)  by Ivan Markovic, wood sculpture

Links (9.8” x 11.8”)  by Ivan Markovic, wood sculpture

2. Yenny Cocq from Santa Fe, New Mexico

Yenny Cocq creates metallic sculptures that are, in perhaps the most economical use of material, the quintessence of companionship, family, and love. Her metal figures are poisedly perched on stone blocks. With smoothed, featureless countenances, scooped, flattened-out torsos and elongated, and, on some occasions, altogether omitted limbs, the figures are parsed down to their simplest form. The effect emphasizes the sympathies and empathies of human love.  

Forever Us (14” x 5”) by Yenny Cocq, metal sculpture

Forever Us (14” x 5”) by Yenny Cocq, metal sculpture

3. Eileen Braun from Dunwoody, Georgia

Eileen Braun’s ocean-inspired ceramic sculptures invoke the ancient mysteries, barnacled creatures, and natural wonders of the underwater world. If the ocean is a realm of curiosity and otherworldliness, then Eileen’s sculptures are the recovered treasures of that world. Her small ceramic sculptures evoke urchins, fish, and the quirky biology of many other underwater creatures. On the level of pure shape, many of her ceramics resemble household items like teapots and bowls. However, through oceanic emblems, these objects are transformed to marvelous creatures. It is as if a brigade of household objects had somehow stumbled into the of the sea and had been morphed by the waters.

Unseen Life on the Reef (12” x 12”) by Eileen Braun, ceramic artwork

Unseen Life on the Reef (12” x 12”) by Eileen Braun, ceramic artwork