Curating

February's New Artist Round Up

 New artists Oliver Pyle working en plein air  

New artists Oliver Pyle working en plein air  

This month, we are delighted to welcome a talented roster of new artists to UGallery. These artists work in a range of styles and mediums and join us from around the globe. We are pleased to introduced the following artists:

INTRODUCING: NATALIA LVOVA

  Sting and Trudie Styler  (36" x 36") by Natalie Lvova, oil painting

Sting and Trudie Styler (36" x 36") by Natalie Lvova, oil painting

Natalia Lvova is a Russian artist living in California. She loves order, and she finds it in making art. Her style, which she calls “twiddle art,” is denoted by tight, swirling brushstrokes that together create colorful shapes. Natalia uses brushes that are hard and flat to achieve this precision. Each brushstroke is placed carefully next to the last, and Natalia is careful not to create any overlap. The result is colorful, contemporary compositions that will delight any viewer who appreciates the exactitude of fine detail.

INTRODUCING: OLIVER PYLE

Oliver creates idyllic watercolor landscapes from his home studio in Sussex, England. “Watercolor is the perfect medium for capturing the vicissitudes of the British climate and allows me to make a spontaneous response to the delicate northern light that is with us for much of the year,” he says. He believes that above all, observation is key to his development as an artist. Oliver derives the most inspiration from being outdoors, in the field, observing his surroundings.

INTRODUCING: ETHAN SOLOUKI

  Programmed  (14" x 9") by Ethan Solouki, wood

Programmed (14" x 9") by Ethan Solouki, wood

Ethan is a young emerging sculptor in Los Angeles. His work is dichotomic; he pairs wood, an organic material, with hard-edge geometry. Made up of clean, contemporary lines, Ethan’s wall sculptures also juxtapose woods that are considered “refined” or “exotic” with woods that are typically used for industrial purposes. The art continues to perpetuate the theme of duality; each piece representing a balanced equilibrium between opposing forces.

INTRODUCING: JENNIFER WILDERMUTH REYES

All of Jennifer’s paintings are representative of an encounter with a critter in natural settings. “Being out in nature is important to me, and I have gotten to see so many wild animals as a result,” she says. “Each time I have an interaction with a new creature, I then create a piece of artwork out of that experience.” Jennifer views animals as being essential companions to mankind. Humans are fascinated by animals; we engage with them, study them, and integrate them into culture. Though Jennifer began her career as an artist painting the human figure, her switch to animals felt only natural. She works from her home studio where she can see birds and squirrels darting in and out of the redwood trees outside.

INTRODUCING: LUCA GAETANO PIRA 

  Human Geometries  by Luca Gaetano Pira, photography

Human Geometries by Luca Gaetano Pira, photography

Luca is an Italian photographer currently based in Madrid. His work explores the relationship between the human figure and the natural environment. Staged nudes within unruly landscapes speak to the innate, ancestral connection that humans have with the land. In his series “Khaos,” Luca is inspired by concepts of biocentrism and the role of human beings within a larger ecosystem. Artfully posed figures bend and twist to imitate their surroundings, symbolizing a physically and visually symbiotic relationship between man and nature.

INTRODUCING: WYNSTON EDUN

Wynston Edun was born in Nigeria and emigrated to the United States in 1987 after receiving his degree in Fine Arts from the University of Benin. He constructs semi-abstract figures with spontaneous bursts of color and impulsive mark making, using both traditional and non-traditional techniques. Wynston’s inspiration derives from human behaviors and characteristics which he depicts by layering color and texture with palette knives, brushes, and natural sponges. Inspired by the narrative figurative style of traditional African art, Wynston’s influences include artists of the African modernist genre who combine traditional and contemporary aesthetics to convey emotion.

INTRODUCING: TONY BELOBRAJDIC

Tony is a self-taught Croatian artist whose primary residence is now Sydney, Australia. He works in a gestural impressionist style that is based on observation, but the final presentation is subject to Tony’s creative vision. “I believe that first impression is more important than the narrative quality of the art,” he says. “The picture should have a hidden message rather than show details.” Tony paints nearly every day, working from both Croatia and Australia, and finds inspiration in human and animal forms.

INTRODUCING: ALISON YE

Alison’s ceramic wall sculptures exist within a detailed fantasy narrative devised by the artist. Each creature belongs to a world of fairies who live in “Ally’s garden.” The characters have distinct personalities, complex relationships, and specific qualities that make each fairy unique. “My art is about love and relationships,” says Alison. “I imagined a fairy land that is all about love, and each character I have created is inspired by real people.” Alison’s fantasy world comes to life in the sculpture studio space that she founded with her husband in the San Francisco Bay Area.

INTRODUCING: ANNE LABAIRE

  Higher Ground  (24" x 24") by Anne Labaire, acrylic painting

Higher Ground (24" x 24") by Anne Labaire, acrylic painting

Anne’s body of work is marked by her passion for artistic experimentation. She enjoys using offbeat tools to create texture in her work, and builds layer upon layer of paint until she achieves an interesting effect. Anne’s focus on texture may be the result of her background in ceramics. “I married a handsome potter and together we created pottery that sold to galleries and craft shops across the country,” she says. Ultimately the couple opened their own gallery, and, lacking the time necessary to make her ceramics, Anne turned to the slightly less labor-intensive medium of painting. “We have since retired from the day-to-day running of the gallery and I paint every day.”

INTRODUCING: RYAN PARK

Ryan Park is a self-taught oil painter working in a contemporary pop style. He uses brand logos and other images from popular culture to comment on the state of American consumerism. Each piece incorporates geometric elements and pops of color to pair a visually dynamic composition alongside overt social commentary. Though still an emerging artist, Ryan utilizes a bold aesthetic reminiscent of great pop artists like James Rosenquist and Andy Warhol.

See more artwork by new artists on UGallery.