Curating

Collection Spotlight: The Artists of New York Collection

In studios scattered through all of New York City’s neighborhoods and beyond, the artists in our New York collection express the state’s vibrant inspiration. From cityscapes of famous skylines to abstract meditations on daily life, here is a closer look at 5 artworks in this collection.

Vibrate 2, an oil painting in Dustin Joyce’s Consumed series, comments on American consumerism a purple and red pop art prism. Dustin transposes the recognizable figures of signage – the crosswalk and trash symbols – into his artwork. The universality, recognizably, and legibility of his symbols suggest consumption’s entrenched role in American culture.

New York City’s SoHo neighborhood has housed leading artists for decades, making an artistic energy is inseparable from the neighborhood’s history. Ellen Bradshaw captures that energy through her impressionistic oil painting. In SoHo Afternoon, Ellen studies the contrast in light and darkness, as the sun illuminates the same concrete canopy that eclipses the street below.

Danielle Siegelbaum’s quadritych (a composition of four canvases) Heads reflects the cultural diversity of New York City. Each one of the four panels is inspired by a single culture, but also incorporates aspects of Native American, Japanese, African, Middle Eastern and Aztec cultures. The blending of cultures on a visual level, enacts the blending of culture on a sociological level.

Orlando Dominguez contorts the smooth, colored metal of his sculptures in the shapes of yoga poses. Bakasana (Crane Pose) is in a precarious balancing posture grounded by the figure’s hands. Orlando explains that, in yoga, crane pose encourages a steadier mind. His sculptures their own questions about yoga, specifically the role of the mental, visual, and, perhaps even, spiritual world relate to the physical world.

Kathleen Giles’ watercolor Ears But They Couldn’t Hear shows a musical encounter that the artist had in New York City’s famous Central Park. One day in the park, Kathleen was struck by a violinist’s playing. As the title suggests, she noticed that others just passed by unaffected. This painting hints at the great variety of experiences that a group of people can have in a single place.

See the full collection Artist of New York Collection on UGallery!